Categories
American History

MODULE “10” DISCUSSION “EXTREMELY IMPORTANT” EACH QUESTION needs an “Example” wh

Need Help With your assignment? Get expert academic writing assistance! We can write any paper on any subject within the tightest time.

Hire A Writer

MODULE “10” DISCUSSION
“EXTREMELY IMPORTANT”
EACH QUESTION needs an “Example” which is an “Artifact, Photograph, Portrait, Letter, Poem, Song”. These Questions NEED TO USE one “EXAMPLE” from both the “Secondary & Primary Sources” that are mentioned within each Question. I have attached ALL sources in separate files!!!!
1. The authors of The American Promise
describe in chapter 27 some of the efforts to press for African
American civil rights during the late 1940s. Several of the
supplementary primary sources assigned in this module likewise
demonstrate the contested state of civil rights during the late 1940s
and early 1950s. Drawing from The American Promise and the
assigned primary source evidence, what examples demonstrate activists’
efforts to challenge segregation? What examples demonstrate resistance
to such efforts? Finally, the documentary film assigned in this module
is the first episode in a landmark documentary series created during the
1980s, Eyes on the Prize. This first episode offers an account of the Brown v. Board of Education decision of 1954 (also described in The American Promise).
What precedent did this ruling set? Why did this ruling inspire civil
rights activists to redouble efforts to challenge segregation?
2. The documentary film from the Eyes on the Prize
series assigned in this module features an account of the lynching of
Emmett Till. Several assigned primary sources in this module also relate
directly to the Till case. Referring to the film, as well as to
supplementary primary source evidence, who was Emmett Till and why was
he lynched? Why did this event become a pivotal moment in the civil
rights movement of the 1950s? What examples from the assigned primary
sources demonstrate the importance of the lynching of Emmett Till?
3. Much of the documentary film from the Eyes on the Prize
series assigned in this module focuses on the Montgomery Bus Boycott of
1955-1956. Several supplementary primary sources assigned in this
module also relate to the bus boycott, which is described in chapter 27
of The American Promise. Utilizing the assigned secondary and
primary source evidence, what prompted the Montgomery bus boycott? What
specific challenges did participants in the boycott face? What factors
contributed to its success?
4. The authors of The American Promise
describe in chapter 27 the revival of gender roles that emphasized
women’s domestic roles that occurred during the late 1940s and 1950s.
Numerous primary sources assigned in this module, in both Reading the American Past
and the supplementary primary source evidence, illustrate the revival
of domesticity, but also some women’s rejection of “traditional” gender
roles. Referring to The American Promise, as well as the assigned primary source evidence, what examples demonstrate the postwar revival of domesticity? (Thank you, Good Housekeeping,
for revealing the advice you published in 1956, as insulting as it may
now seem.) What examples reveal women’s rejection of “traditional”
gender roles? (Finally, before you get mad at me for assigning the 1963
cartoon from the New Yorker, please note two details: that it is a
cartoon intended to produce a chuckle, and the name of its creator.
Who, then, is the butt of the joke? And what does that suggest?)
5. The
“Welcome Home!” cartoon in the supplementary primary sources in this
module illustrates an issue facing many returning veterans at the end of
World War II: a housing shortage. The authors of The American Promise
describe Levittown, as a community where some of the first eleven million
new suburban homes were built through the 1950s. The Levittown exhibit
in the supplementary primary sources contains numerous primary sources,
especially images from this period of rapid suburbanization. Drawing on The American Promise
and assigned primary source evidence, what factors prompted the growth
of suburbs through the 1950s? What role did William Levitt play in this
era of suburbanization? Who most typically lived in suburbs, and who was
excluded? What fears or criticisms did suburbs provoke—for example, in
Malvina Reynolds’s 1962 song, “Little Boxes”?
6. The authors of The American Promise explain in chapter 27 the postwar “culture of abundance.” Drawing on The American Promise
and the assigned primary source evidence, what examples demonstrate the
prosperity and abundance of the postwar years? What factors accounted
for such prosperity? In what ways were the baby boom, development of the
national highway system, and consumption of material goods related to
postwar prosperity?
7. While
the 1950s experienced an era of prosperity, a host of Americans
expressed cultural concerns during the postwar years, concerns that
ranged from worries about television to anxiety about conformist
consumer culture, fears about what cultural artifacts such as comic
books and rock and roll music were having on young people. For instance,
as the authors of The American Promise note in chapter 27,
President Dwight Eisenhower himself expressed misgivings about the role
of television in presidential elections: he was not impressed
with the “Ike for President” television ad created for his 1952
campaign (provided in the supplementary primary sources in this module
). Referring to The American Promise and the assigned primary
source evidence, what examples demonstrate cultural concerns of the
postwar years? On what grounds did critics express their concerns? (A
final note for rock and roll fans: this musical development of the 1950s
is mentioned in chapter 27 of The American Promise. Most agree
that the first rock and roll song is “Rocket 88,” which is provided in
the supplementary primary sources in this module. Many rock and roll
hits of the era featured white artists covering rhythm and blues hits of
African American musicians. Several such examples are provided in the
supplementary primary sources in this module. Anxieties over the
cross-over appeal of African American artists are evident in the New
Orleans White Citizens’ Council warning from 1960 in the supplementary
primary sources.)
8. The photograph on pg. 723 in The American Promise
of schoolchildren during a “duck and cover” drill indicates another
source of anxiety during the postwar years: the specter of atomic
warfare. Drawing from The American Promise and assigned primary
source evidence, including President Dwight Eisenhower’s farewell
address from 1961, for what reasons did the nuclear arms race of the
1950s provoke concerns? What does the evidence suggest about citizens’
responses to the threat of nuclear war? What was the “military-industrial complex” that Eisenhower named in his address (it is also
described at the end of chapter 26 in The American Promise), and why did he express concern about it?

Need Help With your assignment? Get expert academic writing assistance! We can write any paper on any subject within the tightest time.

Hire A Writer

Leave a Reply